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Introduced Senate Bill (S)

DIGEST

Deceptive consumer sales act. Makes the following changes to the deceptive consumer sales act (act): (1) With respect to an action brought by an individual consumer under the act, increases: (A) the amount of statutory damages for an uncured or incurable deceptive act from $500 to $2,000; and (B) the amount of statutory damages for a willful deceptive act from $1,000 to $6,000. (2) In an individual action or a class action under the act, requires the court to award reasonable attorney fees to a prevailing consumer (versus allowing the court to award reasonable attorney fees to the prevailing party Deceptive consumer sales act. Makes the following changes to the deceptive consumer sales act (act): (1) With respect to an action brought by an individual consumer under the act, increases: (A) the amount of statutory damages for an uncured or incurable deceptive act from $500 to $2,000; and (B) the amount of statutory damages for a willful deceptive act from $1,000 to $6,000. (2) In an individual action or a class action under the act, requires the court to award reasonable attorney fees to a prevailing consumer (versus allowing the court to award reasonable attorney fees to the prevailing party in the action, under current law). (3) Provides that an individual action or a class action may be brought under the act with respect to transactions involving the lease of real estate, notwithstanding the act's exemption from such suits for consumer transactions in real property. (4) Removes the act's exemption from individual actions or class actions under the act for violations of the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. (5) Amends the provision concerning prerequisites to bringing an individual action or a class action under the act to provide that a consumer's written notice of a deceptive act to the supplier in the consumer transaction: (A) must be given within the earliest of: (i) one year (versus six months under current law) after the initial discovery of the deceptive act; (ii) one year following the transaction; or (iii) any time limit of at least 30 days under any warranty applicable to the transaction; and (B) is sufficient under the act if the written notice is reasonably calculated to provide notice of the general nature of the deceptive act and the resulting damages. (6) Amends the provision concerning the statute of limitations for actions brought under the act to provide that such actions may not be brought more than six years (versus two years under current law) after the occurrence of the deceptive act. ... View more